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The Top 5 Gun Grips Reviewed

Last Updated on

Top Choice
Hogue Rubber Grip Handall Full Size Grip Sleeve
TALON Grips 705R for Smith and Wesson M&P Shield 9mm/.40, Black Rubber
Foxx Grips -Gun Grips Glock 19, 23, 25, 32, 38 (Grip Enhancement)
Covert Clutch | Universal Tactical Handgun Grip Sleeve with Hex Pattern (Tactical Matte Black)
Hogue 17210 HandAll Grip Sleeve, Tactical, Large Black
MSRP
$7.96
$17.99
$14.99
$7.97
$8.98
Our Rating
4.9
4.6
4.4
4.3
4.1
Weight
1.6 oz
0.8 oz
2.1 oz
0.6 oz
0.5 oz
Material
Modern Soft Durable Rubber
Rubber or Granulate
Rubber
Unique Heat-Seeker Rubber
Modern Soft Durable Rubber
Colors
4
3
2
4
1
Made For
More Than 50 Different Semi-auto Handguns
Smith and Wesson M&P Shield 9mm/.40
Glock 19, 23, 25, 32, 38
Universal
Smaller/Compact Firearms
Top Choice
Hogue Rubber Grip Handall Full Size Grip Sleeve
MSRP
$7.96
Our Rating
4.9
Weight
1.6 oz
Material
Modern Soft Durable Rubber
Colors
4
Made For
More Than 50 Different Semi-auto Handguns
More Information
TALON Grips 705R for Smith and Wesson M&P Shield 9mm/.40, Black Rubber
Model
MSRP
$17.99
Our Rating
4.6
Weight
0.8 oz
Material
Rubber or Granulate
Colors
3
Made For
Smith and Wesson M&P Shield 9mm/.40
More Information
Foxx Grips -Gun Grips Glock 19, 23, 25, 32, 38 (Grip Enhancement)
Model
MSRP
$14.99
Our Rating
4.4
Weight
2.1 oz
Material
Rubber
Colors
2
Made For
Glock 19, 23, 25, 32, 38
More Information
Covert Clutch | Universal Tactical Handgun Grip Sleeve with Hex Pattern (Tactical Matte Black)
MSRP
$7.97
Our Rating
4.3
Weight
0.6 oz
Material
Unique Heat-Seeker Rubber
Colors
4
Made For
Universal
More Information
Hogue 17210 HandAll Grip Sleeve, Tactical, Large Black
MSRP
$8.98
Our Rating
4.1
Weight
0.5 oz
Material
Modern Soft Durable Rubber
Colors
1
Made For
Smaller/Compact Firearms
More Information

Gun grips are very functional gun accessories.

Not only do they make your firearm more comfortable to hold, but they secure the gun better in your hand.

Being able to properly hold your gun is a huge safety concern, as just one slip could cost you dearly. 

In wet conditions some metals become very slippery, which makes for a hazardous situation when shooting. 

To help secure your firearm we put together this list of high quality gun grips that will not only improve your grip, but keep you more safe.

Hogue Handall Full Size Grip Sleeve

We all want easy solutions when we can get them, and Hogue knows that. 

That’s what drop them to make this simple slip-on grip sleeve that’s usable with over fifty different semi-autos on the market. 

If you notice the angular cut, that’s where the magic is. That, and the soft touch rubber that it’s made of.

This slips on and provides plenty of back traction for your thumb and index joint, as well as a good resting spot for your pinky underneath the grip. 

On top of that, the two finger grooves on the front either go over the ones on your gun, or add extra contact points. 

Overall, it’s the least expensive option and in our opinion, the best one available.

TALON Grips

We can’t always predict the exact contact points you’re going to be using on the base of the gun. 

Talon makes these stellar grips for Smith and Wesson M&P pistols, from 9mm up to .40 cal, and did something truly awesome with them. 

They don’t feel like a pistol grip; they feel like you’ve textured the existing handle of your gun.

This rougher design grabs on to multiple micro points of contact to give you ultimate dexterity and control over your gun at all times. 

It takes a few minutes to apply to your pistol, and is fitted to last four about five years before you would need to reapply a new one. 

Unlike other rubberized grips, you won’t get that melty feeling in your palms when you’re done using it.

Foxx Grips

Much like the Smith & Wesson grips we just saw, these have that same excellent texture to them, but they apply in a different way. 

You’re not just slapping one piece of rubber over your entire gun handle. Instead, choose the sidewall grips, finger inlay grips and read grip to your liking. 

If you tend to hold your hand a bit higher on the gun, you can just position the rubber grip around there for improved palm traction.

These don’t make your gun feel bulky, either. Instead of adding a layer of rubber that extends the overall width of your gun, this works with the indentations that it already has. 

You’re adding grip with thin padding, not bulking up the total size of your pistol handle. 

If you want a grip that doesn’t slip over the handle and alter the size of the gun, this is what you’ve been looking for.

Covert Clutch

Universal and ready for action, this slip-over grip is one of the most inexpensive choices on our list, and gives you a great deal of control when you squeeze the trigger. 

Available in four colors, the Covert Clutch will fit just about any standard gunmetal color and design on your firearm of choice.

Due to its elasticity, you could slip this over an M16 or a 9mm glock; it’s really up to you. 

These grips are fitted to last for about two to three years before you’ll need to replace them as they wear down. 

It’s a cheap and quick solution that you can just place over your gun right out of the package.

Hogue Rubber Grip Handall Tactical Grip Sleeve

Hogue’s back in action, and trying to get you back there as well. 

The rubber grip Handall tactical grip sleeve is basically an alternate version of our top pick, and mimics the very low price point at the same time. 

Slip this on over your smaller, more compact firearms for more texture and a stronger grip.

Rubberized grips are usually tough to slip on, but since these aren’t universal, it’s an easy time getting it over the handle of your pistol. 

You won’t have to stretch it out much, meaning these can last for four to five years before wear-and-tear will get the better of it. 

The soft touch rubber feels like it’s always belonged on the gun; your aim won’t change, but you’ll have better overall control.

Grip FAQ

Gun Grip

Why is a Pistol Grip Illegal?

In most cases, a pistol is considered to be a loose semi-automatic weapon that doesn’t pose much of a threat, it only poses an argument for self-defense. 

That being said, a pistol grip is basically—through the obscure lens of the law, coming from multiple states—what turns a pistol into a short-handed rifle.

What is the Grip of a Gun Called?

It’s just called the grip. However, there are different areas where a grip can go that might give it a slightly different name.

Sometimes you can get a grip strip that just goes on the finger inlays of a gun handle. You would refer to those as inlay grips. Same goes for a grip that’s just for the back of your handle.

It’s subjective to the exact area you’re placing it on the gun. You can even put a strip on the bottom of your magazine to give your pinky some extra traction while aiming down sight.

What is the Best Material for Pistol Grips?

In our opinion, hardened rubber will always be the best. There are a few good materials out there, but rubber has a few things going for it.

For one, it’s cheap to manufacture and purchase. You don’t have to hemorrhage a ton of money; it’s not a leather grip or anything fancy like that.

Next, the traction on your fingers is unmatched. Whether you get a natural texture or a different pattern on your rubber grip, it’s going to stick to your hands and improve your aim.

Rubber also slips onto the hilt with ease, since the natural elasticity will just pull over the bottom of the gun handle without issue.

How to Install a Grip on a Gun?

You got one of two different types of grips. We’re going to go over each and explain how to properly install them.

Pull Over Grip

  • After removing from package, dust out the inside of the grip. Some powdery residue might be leftover from production.
  • Gently stretch out the top edges of the grip before applying it to your gun of choice.
  • Using your index and middle finger of your dominant hand, begin pulling the grip over the handle of your gun. You can use your thumb to push up from the bottom, and wiggle the grip onto the gun with your fingers.
  • Once attached, ensure no air bubbles have gotten stuck at the bottom. If they have, simple hit the bottom of the handle until they smooth out and escape up the side.

Grip Strips

  • Peel and stick. These are simple in theory, but if you mess them up you’re out of luck. Start by cleaning off your gun handle so it’s completely clear of dust and debris, and let it dry.
  • Peel the backing off of the strip(s). Some kits might come with a half-dozen different ones, others might just have two: one for each side of the handle.
  • There isn’t a tool that you can accurately use here to determine if it’s level or not. Miniature levelers, sure, but the design of the gun handle isn’t always meant to be level.
  • Starting from one end of the strip, apply it to the area you want. Make sure the corners match up with where you want them, and then slowly run your index along the remaining section of the grip to press it to the handle.
  • Run your finger along the length from where you started to where you ended 3-5 times. Smooth out any air bubbles that might have been trapped underneath.
  • Run your fingers along the grip strips a few times and ensure it feels right. If not, you only have a short window to remove it before the adhesive begins to bond to the surface.
  • Repeat these steps with each strip until you achieve the desired effect. Store your gun in a cool place with minimal humidity to avoid ruining the adhesive.

Gun Grip General Information

Holding Gun

Types of Grip Materials

Some of these might come pre-built into your pistol, some strictly purchasable for external grips, but they’re all relevant and materials you should know about.

Wood

Older guns will have this as their handle, and depending on your preference, you might not need an additional grip.

Wooden handles have this way of contouring to your hand, which is another way you can get a good grip. If you can squeeze the handle properly, you’re good to go.

Wood handles are usually finished and lacquered to avoid splintering or expansion from heat and moisture.

Hardened Rubber

This is basically the type of grip we’re discussing today. Hardened rubber has become the most common grip item, and it used across the board in other types of weapon augmentations.

Hardened rubber is cheap to make, and easy to maintain. Most of the time, some simple cleaning will allow you to carry on about your day without issue.

Low-quality rubber grips are the kind that feel like old bicycle handle grips, like they’re going to melt in your hand. These break apart easily, because those are not hardened rubber. Make sure you see the word hardened.

Metal

This is always pre-built on the gun, but if you get a custom pistol, you can usually have the handle swapped out to make room for some rough metal.

These usually have a diamond weave texture, which we’ll get into in a few moments. Metal grips aren’t the most practical, and if you’re shooting for long periods of time, they can make your hands feel sore.

Leather

This is something you’ll find on old revolvers mostly, and I wish they still made grips like these. Leather just feel excellent in your hand, and it possesses some of the same elasticity as soft touch rubber.

Leather listens to the shape of your hand when you squeeze the trigger. That’s where you get excellent grip from.

The leather pushes down slightly as your fingers dig into it, and the rough exterior gives you good traction.

Grip Patterns (And Why They Matter)

Gun Grip

Grip patterns give you different levels of operation control over your gun. While there isn’t a ton of different grip types, it is important to know the ones we have at our disposal.

Grips are important because, when used in legal situations and to your tactical advantage, they turn your simple firearm into a precision instrument.

Natural Textured

These are perhaps our favorite, and are often revered by gun owners everywhere/ This grip has this rugged, non-symmetrical finish to it, much like the top pick on our list.

Since it isn’t predictable, it grips your hand in a more natural-feeling way, despite it actually being a calculated pattern that is designed to give balanced control across your entire hand.

Untextured

Just the normal feeling of rubber on your hands. Untextured grips just slip on over the handle, and feel like rubber.

So what’s the appeal here? Your hand sticks to it like glue.

Hardened rubber still has a bit of a soft touch to it, but it also lets you hold onto your pistol with massive control.

Soft Touch

It’s technically categorized as something other than untextured, because it uses a different grade of rubber on the exterior.

This is what gives it a soft touch, while the bottom layer of rubber is untextured and sticks to the gun like glue.

Soft touch handles are often easy to control and are slightly thicker than untextured grips.

Diamond Weave

Many times, you’ll see this on the basic grip that comes with the pistol. This uses 45° lines in a crisscross pattern to make little diamond shapes.

The allure here is that it’s simple to hold onto. Diamond weave pistol grips are fairly basic, and don’t offer much more control than the standard pistol grip anyway.

You’ll notice that not many new grips come with a diamond weave texture. Instead, they’ll either use an untextured rubber or natural texture.

Gun Grips Video

Here is a video discussing various Gun Grips:

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